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Real World

Real WorldReal World
Written by Natsuo Kirino, Translated by Philip Gabriel
Vintage Books, 224 pp
Rating: Not Rated

Toshi and her three friends from school find themselves caught up in events following a neighbor’s brutal murder of his own mother. Real World is the third book of Natsuo Kirino’s to be released in the U.S. and like her other novels, Out and Grotesque, offers a dark and unnerving look at the life of women in various parts of modern Japanese society.

Real World depicts the events of the crime and the ensuing fallout through the eyes of the four girls and the killer himself with each chapter switching to a different character’s point of view. This allows us an in depth look into the mind and experiences of each girl and how they relate, not only to each other, but to the world at large. As things progress it becomes obvious that each girl is hiding something from the group. This ranges from sexual orientation, insecurities, broken relationships with their parents and more. Ironically nearly all these deep seated fears and secrets are glaringly obvious to everyone else in the group. Each girl is pushed and pulled by her own desires and the expectations placed upon her by both society, family and her own friends. The result is extreme isolation and alienation from even each other. Because of all the stresses and the feeling of being trapped, when Toshi’s neighbor murders his mother each girl is fascinated with the event. Some are envious, others resentful, and it’s the alienation and fascination with his willingness to cross the line and escape from his situation which draws them into the murder.

While Kirino does a good job at building up their characters and explaining their involvement and the choices they make the girls never quite feel unique and individual from each other. Maybe it’s due to the translation but if it wasn’t for the chapters being named after the character it’s focusing on I’m not sure I’d be able to tell who was narrating, they all seem to share a single voice. The only real noticeable variation comes from the male killers chapter which is marked by delusions which alternate from disturbing to humorous. Perhaps this was intended though, something to show that each girl is internally similar despite her own beliefs otherwise.

Real World is not the best novels I’ve read from Natsuo Kirino and I don’t think it’s my favorite either. The girls barely develop beyond the cliche’s they’re based upon and the killer’s loosing grasp on sanity never reaches the disturbing levels of similar descent into insanity that appeared in Grotesque. It’s still an ok read but it’s not as memorable or as fascinating as her other two books released in the U.S.

Real World is available now from Random House.

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