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.hack//Cell, Vol. 2

.hack//Cell, Vol. 2.hack//Cell, Vol. 2
Written by Ryo Suzukaze, Art by Akira Mutsuki, Translated by Jackie McClure
Tokyopop, 224 pp
Rating: Older Teen (16 +)

The tale of two Midori’s reaches it’s conclusion in the second volume of .hack//Cell by Ryo Suzukaze. The Midori of the real world lies stricken by an unknown disease desperately hanging onto life in her hospital room. Meanwhile the Midori of the World, the MMO, becomes aware of her true origins and searches out her reason for existing. The connection between the two is made clear as both Midori’s face their final fates.

Sadly this volume is a bit of a let down after the rather enjoyable first half. More of the story seems to take place in the real world and the origins of the World’s Midori just feels off. The connection between the two is revealed but feels oddly anti-climatic. Add in to this an extended period of time with the World’s Midori attempting to interact with the real world and the strange way with which everyone she encounters seems to accept her origins and existence with no problem and her existence takes on a weird every day feel despite it apparently not being an every day event. Still, the World’s Midori is rather compelling at times as she wrestles with the revelations of her existence and what it means to her as an individual. The rest of the supporting cast lumbers rather unremarkably with only Adamas showing some growth as he moves from coward into something that more closely resembles a traditional shonen action hero at times, albeit an unsuccessful one.

Akira Mutsuki’s artwork continues to be weird and ungainly throughout the book. Beautifully detailed pictures depict scenes from the book, the characters are clothed in elaborate and gorgeous looking costumes, and then they’re perched on unnaturally long and strangely deformed legs and you’re left wondering how they’re capable of supporting their own weight on those broken tooth picks. Still, there is something undeniably pretty about the artwork, even if it does border on the incomprehensible a few times during this volume.

I really wanted to love and enjoy this book but ultimately it just fell flat for me. The origin of The World’s Midori is weird and feels like a huge stretch and I didn’t really feel the ultimately resolution held together terribly well. Still, I’m glad I know how it ends if only to warn folks away from bothering with this series. In the end .hack//Cell starts off well but sputters to a fairly uninteresting conclusions with this second volume.

.Hack//Cell, Vol. 1 was published by Tokyopop and is available now.

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