Home > Manga Reviews, Reviews > Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches, Vol. 3

Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches, Vol. 3

School has thrown my weekly review schedule into turmoil, but I’ll keep cranking them out when I can! Until then, news and reviews ahoy!

And now, onto this week’s review of Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches, Vol. 3!

Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches, Vol. 3Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches, Vol. 3
by Miki Yoshikawa
Kodansha Comics, 192 pgs
Rating: Older Teen (16 +)

A new rival appears! as Ryu and the Supernatural Studies Club enjoy the fruits of his ability to switch bodies via smooching, student council member Nene Odagiri emerges to throw a wrench into their fun. With the threat of blackmail hanging over his head, Ryu finds himself slowly being drawn into the politics and power plays of the student council. From Miki Yoshikawa comes Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches, Vol. 3!

I’m not really feeling this series. While the humor surrounding the body swapping and the other power is fine, the characters just feel too one note. Ryu’s the misunderstood outcast, who seems rough and tumble but is really a nice guy at heart. Urara’s the highly successful student who’s a bit stand offish, but has moments of genuine emotion and warmth towards Ryu, which is shocking because they’re so different, and on and on it goes. We’re three volumes in and while the series is a little goofy and kind of fun, it’s not really doing anything to make it stand out from the other high school dramas that are out there. Even with the magic kissing powers and abilities it still feels a little, been there done that. Revelations in this volume might alter this and hints at greater mysteries surrounding the schooling the powers, but I’m not sure the characters are compelling enough to make me care.

A page form Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches, Vol. 3

Smoooooch

Miki Yoshikawa’s artwork is fine. The setting requires it to be full of school uniforms, but she gets around the conformity and sameness thanks to the characters hair and body langauge. Ryu’s always a bit aggressive, stressed out and highly emotive, which contrasts a bit with Ushio, who’s often sporting a much calmer and cooler manner. Of course, Ushio’s also got glasses, which seems to be required for the calm, collected school boy in modern anime and manga. While the character’s reactions are often comically over the top, Miki Yoshikawa stops just short of crossing the line into ridiculous chibified antics, blending the physical comedy and extreme moments in nicely with the more grounded bits of the series.

While Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches has been getting some positive buzz online, it’s just not clicking for me. It’s light and fun, but also feels a bit familiar and samey at this point. Maybe it will pick up as the series goes on, but it does leave me wondering just how many high school comedies/romances/dramas we need.

Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches, Vol. 3 are available now from Kodansha Comics. Review copiy provided by the publisher.

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  1. September 29, 2015 at 4:42 am

    I have enjoyed what I have read of the Yamada-Kun manga. it’s funny and the story keeps things fresh. One thing I dislike is that they keep adding more and more characters to the mix. The core group I liked doesn’t get much attention anymore.

    • September 29, 2015 at 1:43 pm

      That’s kind of a bummer. The playful interactions between the four in the Supernatural Club was one of the things I really liked about the first two volumes.

  1. September 29, 2015 at 6:59 am
  2. October 2, 2015 at 4:48 pm

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