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Attack on Titan: Choose Your Path Adventure

January 12, 2018 3 comments

The cover for Attack on Titan: Choose Your Path AdventureAttack on Titan: Choose Your Path Adventure
Written by Tomoyuki Fujinami, Illustrated by Ryosuke Fuji and Toru Yoshii, Attack on Titan created by Hajime Isayama, Translated by Kevin Steinbach
Kodansha Comics, 256 pp.
Rating: Teens (16+)

Hajime Isayama’s Attack on Titan has become an international hit, and like most international hits, it’s branched out into other media and product lines. It’s been adapted into live action, anime, video games, visual novels, audio plays, light novels, and now… a Choose Your Own Adventure novel! Set during the Siege of Trost, the opening arc of the manga, Attack on Titan: Choose Your Path Adventure allows readers to take part in the the battle and fight alongside Eren, Mikasa, Armin, and the rest of their fellow cadets. Your decisions can influence the outcome of the battle, and even cause it go in new and unexpected directions unseen in the original series or its various adaptions. Will Eren and his friends die at the hands of the Titans? Will the walls fall, allowing the Titans to overrun humanity once and for all? And most importantly, will you survive long enough to find out?
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Ravina the Witch

June 5, 2017 1 comment

Ravina The Witch?Ravina The Witch
By Junko Mizuno, Translation by C.B. Cebulski, Patrick Macias, and Jason Thompson
Titan Comics, 48 pp.
Rating: Not Rated

From Junko Mizuno, the creator of Little Fluffy Gigolo Pelu and Princess Mermaid, comes her latest work, Ravina the Witch; a short story about a little girl named Ravina, who lives in a garbage dump, and her adventures as she journeys across a fairy tale landscape.
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Sword of Honor

October 27, 2015 Leave a comment

It’s been a while, I know. Sorry about that, classes have been running me ragged. I’ve got something a little different for you today, a novel review! The news and manga reviews will be returning shortly, but for today I’ll be taking a look a Sword of Honor by David Kirk!

Sword of HonorSword of Honor
by David Kirk
Doubleday, 464 pgs
Rating: Not Rated

David Kirk’s Sword of Honor is the second book is series about the life the legendary Japanese swordsman, Minamoto Musashi. Beginning shortly after the last, major battle of Japan’s Warring States Period in 1600, it depicts the feud between Miyamoto Musashi and the esteemed Yoshioka Sword School in Japan’s former capital of Kyoto.
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The Science of Attack on Titan

August 13, 2015 Leave a comment

Welcome to the latest midweek manga review here at Sequential-Ink! There was a brief break last week due to finals, but I’m back on track and looking to return to a twice a week schedule for the rest of the month. Despite the fact that I just welcomed you to a midweek manga review, this midweek review is actually a little different as I’ll be looking at The Science of Attack on Titan, which technically isn’t manga! Before we get that though, some news from the past two weeks…

And now, onto this week’s review of The Science of Attack on Titan!

The Science of Attack on TitanThe Science of Attack on Titan
Written by Rikao Yanagita, Illustrated by Maru Fujishima, Additional Illustrations and Attack on Titan originally created by Hajime Isayama, Translated by Ko Ransom.
Kodansha Comics, 208
Rating: Older Teen (16 +)

As Attack on Titan mania sweeps the world, leading to spin off series, anime series, OVA’s, action figures, games, moves and more, one man dares to ask the important questions! One man dares to ask just what is the body temperature of a Titan, or just how fast does the vertical maneuvering gear move you through the air. That man is Rikao Yanagita and he’s written The Science of Attack on Titan to address just such issues!
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Attack on Titan: Kuklo Unbound

June 15, 2015 Leave a comment

Attack on Titan: Kuklo UnboundAttack on Titan: Kuklo Unbound
Created by Hajime Isayama, novel by Ryo Suzukaze, art by Thores Shibamoto
Vertical Comics, 300 pgs
Rating: Not Rated

Set some 70 years before the events of Attack on Titan, Attack on Titan: Kuklo Unbound details a turning point in humanity’s struggle against the implacable Titans, a turning point that comes with a most unexpected backstory. Following a rampage by a Titan through Shingangshina district, a lone child emerges from his dead mother’s womb. Dubbed the Titan’s Son, Kuklo, he will go on to create an art that will change the world of Attack on Titan for all time. From Ryo Suzukaze and Thores Shibamoto, comes an untold tale from the history of Hajime Isayama’s Attack on Titan!
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Errantry: Strange Stories

January 30, 2013 Leave a comment

errantryErrantry: Strange Stories
Written by Elizabeth Hand
Small Beer Press, 288 pp
Rating: Not Rated

Errantry: Strange Stories, a collection of short, strange stories is the latest release from Elizabeth Hand. This collection is comprised primarily of tales about normal people and their encounters with things far beyond the norm.

Being a short story collection each tale is ultimately different, dealing with different characters and ideas, though many are unified by shared themes. The most obvious among them being encounters with the supernatural and otherworldly, and the recent loss of a loved one. This turns up again and again in the volume, most notably in the opening story, “The Maiden Flight of McCauley’s Bellerophon“, “Uncle Lou” and the deeply unsettling “Near Zennor”. In addition Hand often sets the stories in the wilderness or at the edge of civilization. Isolated Maine communities, something fans of her Cassandra Neary stories should be familiar with, hard to reach, rural English towns, abandoned islands in the South and more. Hand uses these lonely, natural settings as “soft spots” areas where the skin between the “mundane” real world we all know and the “other” world is at its thinnest and where they often interact. They’re the areas one expects and associates legends of fairy mounds, hauntings, big foot encounters and more. These encounters almost always occur without explanation which, bizarrely, lends them a certain grounded feeling. As a result, each feels less like some spectacular, over the top urban fantasy story, and instead carry the same feeling as modern accounts of encounters with ghosts, UFO’s and other unexplained phenomena. It’s a smart move and one that makes the encounters that much more effective and genuine.

While all the stories are entertaining and enjoyable, the stand out in this volume is easily “Near Zennor”. The story starts off normally enough and focuses on a man dealing with the death of his wife. What starts out as an attempt to clear out her belongings leads him on a quest with disturbing implications regarding her childhood, and ultimately leads to one of the most terrifying and disturbingly realistic paranormal encounters I’ve ever come across in fiction. It’s a moment that left me deeply unnerved, and something that haunted my dreams and left me with an unsettled feeling which lingered for several days after having read it.

Errantry seems like it would be a decent introduction to her work for newcomers, while appealing to her already existing fanbase by collection some of these wonderful gems in one handy location. All in all, it’s an enjoyable and solid collection with “Near Zennor” along being worth the price of admission.

Errantry: Strange Stories is available now from Small Beer Press. Review copy provided by the publisher.

Eiji Tsuburaya: Master of Monsters

November 14, 2012 Leave a comment

Eiji Tsuburaya: Master of Monsters
By August Ramone
Chronicle Books, 200 pp
Rating: Not Rated

Eiji Tsuburaya: Master of Monsters is a look back at the life and career of one of the most influential names in Japanese cinema. Perhaps best known in the west as one of the co-creators of Godzilla, Tsuburaya’s legacy goes far beyond that and August Ramone does a fantastic job at illuminating other aspects of this legendary creator’s life and career.

The bulk of the book focuses on the different eras of Tsuburaya’s career, beginning with a biographical like look back at Tusburaya’s childhood, his family and more before it segues into his career in special effects. While the early days of his life certainly hold some interest it’s Tsuburaya’s film career that’s the main attraction here, and what a career it is. As I mentioned above, if people have heard of Tusburaya in America it’s mostly likely as a co-creator of Godzilla, but August Ramone shows that he’s gone far beyond on that and makes a good case for Tsuburaya being an incredible innovator and driving force behind key trends in Japanese pop culture; not to mention laying the ground work for Japanese visual effects and creating techniques, methods, and even camera rigs, which are still used to this day. Along the way he touches bases with all of his famous movies, and a fair amount which Western audiences are probably ignorant of. The Godzilla and Ultraman franchise both figure heavily into the book, but along the way are other movies and TV shows he was involved with as well, including his propaganda films and works such as Booska, a children’s TV series.

In addition to the main chapters focusing on different parts of Tsuburaya’s career, there’s a number of essays and articles from other writers, critics and contemporaries. These range from brief looks at the toys based upon Tsuburaya’s creations, to a look at the careers of his associates like Ishiro Honda and Akira Ifukube, to accounts and remembrances of working at Tsuburaya Productions from his son, Akira Tsuburaya.

If all this wasn’t enough, the book is also full of absolutely gorgeous, eye catching, high quality photographs, giving readers a lovely look behind the scenes of shows like Ultra Q, the Godzilla movies and more. Images of Tsuburaya at work, various movie posters, toys, statues and more litter almost every page of the book, making it a visual treat as well as an engaging read.

After reading Eiji Tsuburaya: Master of Monsters, I found myself wishing that more of these movies and TV shows were available in the US. While several of the major ones, a large chunk of the Godzilla cannon is currently unavailable, as are a number of movies and TV shows he had worked on. To make matters worse, the book isn’t available anymore either! Still, this is most definitely a must have for hardcore fans of Tsuburaya’s various creations and is worth tracking down through your local library system if you don’t feel like paying through the nose for it.

Eiji Tsuburaya: Master of Monters was published by Chronicle Books.

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